Classic Van Auction Talk

Sunday, 30 October 2016

1970 FORD CORTINA Mk II 3.O Litre SAVAGE ESTATE - SILVERSTONE AUCTIONS

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: CLCK HERE
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COMING TO AUCTION
Brought to you by: Classic Chatter

Classic Chatter is an independent website for owners & enthusiasts of all types of historic vehicles.

As well as our main website we post regularly on our sites related to Showroom Classics, Auction & Event News.

12th & 13th NOVEMBER 2016
NEC BIMINGHAM



1970 FORD CORTINA Mk II 
3.O Litre SAVAGE ESTATE


Jeff Uren was a very well respected racing driver, engineer and team manager in the late fifties and early sixties, and after some early club racing, drove in the inaugural year of the British Saloon Car 


Championship in 1958. The following year he won the series in a Ford Zephyr beating the 'Works' cars and drivers, prompting Ford to offer him a very prestigious 'works' drive. He left in 1962, and joined John Willment as competition manager, preparing and racing Ford Galaxies, Falcons, Cobras and of course GT40s. When Willment stopped racing Uren felt ready to strike out on his own and formed 'Race Proved Ltd'  having recognised the rapidly expanding market in tuning and modifying road-going saloons. There were a large number of companies already catering for those customers who wanted better camshafts, big-valve heads etc., however, he planned a different approach by fitting larger capacity engines into production cars.

When the Mk.2 Cortina was launched in 1966, Jeff saw the car’s potential as a fast long-distance cruiser and set about fitting a tuned version of the new Essex 3.0 litre v6 (140bhp) into one, and the results were spectacular. The 'Savage' had arrived. The motoring press raved about its relaxed muscle car-like performances and Race Proved were soon converting brand new 1600Es - at their peak in the late sixties- at a rate of 15-20 cars a week.  The cars featured a revised cooling system, modified cross member, up-rated suspension, a 'powr-lok' diff, and an extra boot mounted, 8-gallon tank above the rear axle.

Not surprisingly, they were very well regarded and even had tacit approval from Ford. Eventually, some 1,700 cars were converted by the time these upgrades finished of which around 1,000 were Mk2 Cortinas. A few of these were Estates, a strange concept at the time, but brilliantly predated the Audi RS Avant and the BMW M5 Touring by 30 years.

The Ford Cortina Savage Estate offered here was Jeff Uren's own car, and you can imagine that it would have the best of everything and be continuously developed by the founder himself. It was ordered and delivered in 1971 to Jeff Uren Ltd. and in addition to the full Savage 3.0 litre Essex V6 conversion, it was also fitted with Automatic transmission, Lotus gauges and RS seats. The Savage remained Jeff's daily transport for twenty years before being sold in 1991. The fourth owner acquired this remarkable car in 2001 and immediately commenced a full restoration costing circa £30,000, and the very high standard of this work is evident when you inspect the car. The brief was to return the car to superb condition whilst retaining as much of the originality as possible. Included within the car's highly detailed service history is a fascinating notebook, hand written by Uren, detailing all mileages and services of the car up until 1979, as well as the original Ford Cortina Owner's Handbook and the Savage conversion invoices.

Few conversions outside of the factory offerings conjure up such affection and credibility as Uren's ‘Savages'. This is an important car that was a significant part of the seventies tuning scene. It has an impeccable history from a very exciting time, and offers outstanding value and provenance.


SELECTED BY: CLASSIC CHATTER
KEEPING IT CLASSIC
Since: 2010









Friday, 28 October 2016

1958 Lotus Elite Series 1- Ex Chris Barber and "For the Love of Cars" - SILVERSTONE AUCTIONS

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: CLCK HERE
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COMING TO AUCTION
Brought to you by: Classic Chatter

Classic Chatter is an independent website for owners & enthusiasts of all types of historic vehicles.

As well as our main website we post regularly on our sites related to Showroom Classics, Auction & Event News.

12th & 13th NOVEMBER 2016
NEC BIMINGHAM


1958 LOTUS ELITE SERIES 1
Ex Chris Barber and "For the Love of Cars"

· Registered initially as CB 23.
 1958 Earls Court Motor Show Lotus display car.
· Bought new by Jazz Legend Chris Barber.
· Extensively raced in top level, International Sports Car racing 1958-1963.
· Class Winner: 1963 Tourist Trophy, Goodwood.
· Just emerged from a top quality, very exacting restoration as an historic racing car for C4's 'For the Love of Cars' TV program. Stored for many years prior to its restoration commencing in early 2016.
· Restoration carried out by renowned engineer Ant Anstead's team at Evanta Motors with assistance from Lotus marque experts.

Lotus Elite 1009 represents a unique proposition for buyers wanting to race in top-level historic motor sport or add to a stable of historically interesting cars. Its history and provenance make this Elite one of the most famous in the world and mean it would be welcome at any prestigious historic race meeting or show, worldwide.
Not only is it the first Elite produced as a production vehicle for sale rather than a pre-production prototype as the previous eight were, but it was originally purchased by one of Colin Chapman's favoured customers and friends, jazz legend Chris Barber, a man whose music was influential in the British Blues and Jazz scene of the 1950s and 1960s and whose band was behind the UK's first Rock'n'Roll record, 'Rock Island Line' by Lonnie Donegan.


Barber entered and raced the car extensively for 5 seasons in top-level international sports car racing in the UK and Europe including the Nürburgring, Spa and Zandvoort. During this period it was driven regularly by Sir John Whitmore, the 'Racing Baronet', who famously broke the class lap record at Spa using CB23 while on his way to class victory in the Grand Prix GT Support Race of 1962. Other notable drivers who drove the car include Mike Beckwith and Bob Olthoff as well as Chris Barber himself.

Lotus Elite History
The Lotus Elite was debuted at the 1957 Earls Court Motor Show and caused an absolute sensation, the star of the show. At this time it was, without any doubt, the most beautiful and aerodynamic British-built road car ever designed, yet it was being presented by Lotus, a company that was just five years old! The fact it was also made entirely from the new wonder material, glass fibre, simply added to the Elite's aura of other-worldliness. It cost just under £2,000, double the price of the Lotus Seven Chapman had also recently announced, but good value for a car of its complexity, performance and elegance when you consider an Aston Martin DB MkIII was well over £3,000.


Lotus' first foray into building a race inspired GT road car for serious production, the Type 14 Elite was the first car to be produced using 'fibreglass' monocoque construction; a technology then in its infancy and first seen, in a much cruder form, on miniature economy sports car the Berkeley SA322. Chapman, however, was obsessed by efficiency and in a car, whether road or race, that meant light weight and low drag. The Elite had a CD figure of 0.29, remarkable now let alone in 1958, and utilised the maximum amount of energy then possible from every ounce of petrol it consumed; amazingly it was capable of returning around 40mpg even when touring at 80plus mph! Chapman saw the fibreglass monocoque as a way of achieving this without the need for expensive tooling, which he simply could not afford.


Though still a young man, he was just 29 when the Elite was launched, Chapman was not in awe of more established companies or designers; indeed he relished looking at the basic problem of making a car go as fast as possible over a given distance with completely fresh eyes. He was also very ambitious and saw that if he wanted to grow Lotus into a serious force in racing he had to follow Enzo Ferrari's model of making road cars which paid for the racing. His first attempt, the Six, was a successful but basic car and by 1956 he had ideas about producing a small upmarket GT car with serious performance using the Coventry Climax engine he was so familiar with from racing.


He gathered together his small army of young volunteers, who often worked for beer and sandwiches just to be part of a world-beating racing car company, for this exciting new project. Frank Costin looked at the aerodynamics of Peter Kirwan-Taylor's overall shape, while friends from the Ford Motor Company design office, John Frayling, Peter Cambridge and Ron Hickman, did the detail work on the interior and other aspects. The aim, to produce a coupe that could be used on the road for touring and also race at Le Mans was very ambitious, but the young team more than achieved it. Chapman's own suspension design, softly sprung yet firmly damped, all independent by wishbones at the front and Chapman struts at the rear, gave the Elite fantastically predictable handling while the brakes, all disc but fitted inboard at the rear to reduce unsprung weight, proved more than able to cope with stopping this lightweight gem. The successful Lotus 12 racer also contributed its wheelbase and track.


Lotus' groundbreaking fibreglass monocoque was initially developed away from their own workforce for secrecy by Peter Frayling and 21-year-old assistant Albert Adams. The first Elite bodyshell was 'cast' on Saturday, August 31st 1957 and that day Chapman took the decision to debut the car at the Earls Court Show in October 1957. Remarkably the team made that deadline but then had to develop the car into something which worked reliably and could be produced efficiently. This car is the first customer car, chassis #1009 and would be finished in October 1958, just in time to be displayed at the Motor Show alongside the last prototype, 1008. It was then fine tuned before being officially sold to Chris Barber, and entered in the Lotus' Cars ledger on 31/12/1958. Barber, though, had already raced the car as the owner on the 26th of December, Boxing Day, Brands Hatch Sports Car race, so it seems likely the ledger entry was made on the day the factory returned to work following the Christmas break.
By the time Elite production ceased in September 1963, 1030 examples had been made and Lotus had developed from a company unheard of outside of UK club racing to one of the most famous racing teams in the world. They were about to be crowned F1 World Champions for the first time with Jim Clark, and were seen as established world players in road car manufacture with a mature market presence in the USA and elsewhere. The Elite played a big part in this remarkable feat of automotive industrial growth. It was Lotus' first 'grown-up', credible road car and laid down the foundations of the Lotus business that still exists today.

Restoration.
Lotus Elite 1009 has undergone a very high quality nut and bolt restoration by renowned restorer Ant Anstead at Evanta Motors as a racing car, and is not currently road registered. The restoration has been filmed for a forthcoming episode of the 'For the Love of Cars' series which has been so successful worldwide, something which can only add to this car's remarkable provenance.
The restoration involved stripping the car to a bare monocoque and started by examining it with prominent Lotus Elite authority Malcolm Ricketts. The fibreglass monocoque was found to be very sound and original but was stripped back completely and then lovingly refinished in UDT Green.
It was then fitted with a full, FIA Approved, roll cage by Pete Folbigg from 'Fabricage'. The Elite's unique construction makes meeting modern safety standards quite involved and Fabricage have developed a floor mounted frame in addition to their cage. This has been fitted to over a dozen Elites worldwide and is the gold-standard in Elite roll cages. This was accompanied by an FIA homologated Tillett B6F Carbon-GRP racing seat, TRS belts and a Moto-Lita steering wheel.
The engine was rebuilt by Coventry Climax specialist, Glyn Peacock, to his full race 'all steel' specification which includes forged pistons and rods, a steel crank, big valves and every other modification he has developed in many years building only Coventry Climax FW engines. It was tested on the dyno and  produced 120bhp@7300rpm.
The original MGA sourced gearbox was rebuilt by well-known specialist Mike Jennings who fitted a new layshaft, front and rear bearings, and strengthened the clutch slave cylinder mounting. The gears and syncro-cones were found to be perfect.
New wheels, from specialist MWS, were fitted with the correct Dunlop racing tyres.
Once the suspension had been rebuilt with all new parts from Mk14 Components it was set up by well known Elite specialists who ensured that this Elite flows down the road in the way Colin Chapman intended.
Every detail has been restored to better than new standard using only top quality components. The result is a car that is a joy to behold and a thrill to drive. A car that will be competitive in 1300cc class racing just as it was when new and will be welcomed by any prestigious event organiser because of its unique history and bewitching beauty. It also has the latest FIA HTP papers and is thus eligible for all International events.
Offered in pristine condition, and ready to race with fresh FIA HTP papers, this Lotus Elite Type 14 Mk1 presents a unique opportunity for collectors and racers alike.
Suppliers list:
Engine builder: Glyn Peacock Engineering. http://climax-engines.co.uk/
Gearbox builder: Mike Jennings, Harrow Cross Engineering. 01787460965
Rollcage: Fabricage UK. www.fabricageuk.co.uk 01223 870563
Racing Seat: Tillet Racing seats. www.tillett.co.uk
Belts: TRS Motorsport harnesses. www.trs-motorsport.com/
Wheels: Motor Wheel Services. www.mwsint.com
Parts: Mk14 Components. www.mk14components.com/


SELECTED BY: CLASSIC CHATTER
  KEEPING IT CLASSIC 
Since: 2010 
 


Thursday, 27 October 2016

1927 BUICK OPERA COUPE COYS AUCTION


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: CLCK HERE
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COMING TO AUCTION
Brought to you by: Classic Chatter

Classic Chatter is an independent website for owners & enthusiasts of all types of historic vehicles.

As well as our main website we post regularly on our sites related to Showroom Classics, Auction & Event News.


SATURDAY 29th OCTOBER 2016
ALEXANDRA PALACE, LONDON, N22 7AY
Website: www.coys.co.uk


1927 BUICK OPERA COUPE

Under the stewardship of General Motors’ President William C Durant, Buick production rose dramatically from 750 cars in 1905 to 8,802 in 1908 when its most popular product was the four-cylinder Model 10, a direct competitor for Ford’s Model T. The company introduced its first six-cylinder car in 1914 and for a period in the 1920s the range would consist entirely of sixes. A detachable cylinder head, strengthened chassis and axles, and four-wheel brakes were new introductions on the six-cylinder line for 1924, the last year of Buick’s base-model four. Replacing the latter for 1925, the Standard Six boasted a new, overhead-valve engine displacing 191cu in and producing 50bhp, while the larger Master Six came with a 255cu in, 70bhp unit. The duo were restyled for 1926 and given larger engines of 207 and 274cu in respectively and continued almost unaltered throughout 1927. For this season, the cars were visibly distinguishable by their slightly rounded radiator edges and on Fisher bodies such as this car, a dual swage moulding.


This car, a  four passenger coupe,  has a smaller front passenger seat that folds forward to allow easy access to the rear seat, a style often referred to as an “Opera coupe” and undeniably much better looking that the common sedan.


This example has enjoyed a detailed restoration which is supported by 100s of photographs, and is now presented in good condition in all respects. The Opera is said to drive well, with a nicely functioning Autovac vacuum fuel pump.


This handsome vintage Buick is offered for sale with a UK V5 certificate, in addition to the original 1927 handbook and various invoices for works completed



Wednesday, 26 October 2016

1933 VALE SPECIAL - COYS AUCTION

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: CLCK HERE
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COMING TO AUCTION
Brought to you by: Classic Chatter

Classic Chatter is an independent website for owners & enthusiasts of all types of historic vehicles.

As well as our main website we post regularly on our sites related to Showroom Classics, Auction & Event News.


SATURDAY 29th OCTOBER 2016
ALEXANDRA PALACE, LONDON, N22 7AY
Website: www.coys.co.uk


1933 VALE SPECIAL


The Vale Motor Company was established in 1931 by Pownoll Pellew (later 9th Viscount Exmouth) as a ‘gentleman’s hobby’ in a rented workshop behind The Warrington pub in Maida Vale. It was initially funded by Pellew (helped by his mother and his actress girlfriend Kay Walsh) and his two business partners Allan Gaspar (with help from his bank manager father), and Robert Owen Wilcoxon (thanks to early film proceeds of his film actor brother Henry Wilcoxon).  It was Henry who designed the striking Vale Motor Co. badge.


The cars were initially handmade and based on Triumph Motor Company components. The first cars used the 832 cc side-valve engine from the Triumph Super 7 fitted to a chassis bought in from Rubery Owen, semi-elliptic leaf springs all round, and the hydraulic brakes and axles from the Triumph.


Most of the cars had lightweight two-seater open bodies with fold-flat windscreens, but a four-seat version on a long-wheelbase chassis, called the Tourette, was available with the larger-engined versions.
This is one of fewer than 30 Vales surviving and this particular example is even more special because it was the trials vehicle owned by the partner R O “ Bang” Wilcoxon; this has been verified by history expert of this marque, Dave Cox.  Included in the sale is a copy of his book “ Ave Atque Vale” and correspondence from him relating to this car. The present vendor recently imported the car from the USA where is was much rallied and he even has a photo of the US celebrity collector Jay Leno sitting in it!
The history file includes a Vintage Car Club of America log book, pictures of it racing in the US, a collection of period articles and correspondence  back to when it left the UK in the 1980s, along with invoices for work done over the years. The car comes with wings fitted but are easily removed for racing/hillclimbing. A great sports car for road or track use with a nice history.



SELECTED BY: CLASSIC CHATTER
KEEPING IT CLASSIC
Since: 2010



Tuesday, 25 October 2016

1974 ALFA ROMEO ALFETTA - COYS AUCTION

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: CLCK HERE
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COMING TO AUCTION
Brought to you by: Classic Chatter

Classic Chatter is an independent website for owners & enthusiasts of all types of historic vehicles.

As well as our main website we post regularly on our sites related to Showroom Classics, Auction & Event News.



SATURDAY 29th OCTOBER 2016
ALEXANDRA PALACE, LONDON, N22 7AY
Website: www.coys.co.uk


1974 ALFA ROMEO ALFETTA


Introduced in 1974 the Alfetta GT was designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro at Italdesign and Alfa Romeo. It had a much more sporting appearance than the saloon with a drag coefficient of 0.39 and one of its quirkier details was the positioning of the instruments, the rev counter was directly in front of the driver, whilst the speedometer and other gauges were in the centre of the dashboard.
It was initially only available with the 1.8 litre (1,779 cc) version of the Alfa DOHC 4 cylinder Engine and featured a chain driven 8 valve twin overhead cam cylinder head of cross-flow design. In 1976 with the final phasing out of the earlier 105 Series cars – GT 1300 Junior and GT 1600 Junior and 2000 GTV, the 1.8 Engine was discontinued in favour of the 1.6 litre (1,570 cc) and 2.0 litre (1,962 cc).


Imported recently from Italy, this incredibly rare Alfetta GT 1.8 rolled off the production line in August of 1974, destined for Lecce, Southern Italy, where it spent much of its life. As with other Alfetta GTs, this delightful car was fitted with the 1779cc Twin OHC engine, a 5 speed gearbox, and 14” Campagnolo alloy wheels.
Finished in Rosso Red with grey/black cloth trim and restored in Italy before being imported to the UK, this rust-free example is presented in good condition throughout with exceptionally nice paintwork and a lovely interior.
This Alfetta is said to drive exceptionally well and is offered with a UK MoT certificate and V5 document. We believe this entry level GT car represents excellent value in the current market, with good potential for future growth.



SELECTED BY: CLASSIC CHATTER
KEEPING IT CLASSIC
Since 2010




Monday, 24 October 2016

1953 VOLKSWAGEN TYPE 1 BEETLE - COYS AUCTIONS

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: CLCK HERE
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COMING TO AUCTION
Brought to you by: Classic Chatter

Classic Chatter is an independent website for owners & enthusiasts of all types of historic vehicles.

As well as our main website we post regularly on our sites related to Showroom Classics, Auction & Event News.


SATURDAY 29th OCTOBER 2016
ALEXANDRA PALACE, LONDON, N22 7AY
Website: www.coys.co.uk

1953 VOLKSWAGEN TYPE 1 BEETLE


In April 1934, the German Chancellor gave the order to Ferdinand Porsche to develop a Volkswagen (literally, “People’s Car” in German). The moniker Volks- literally, “people’s,” had been applied to other Government-sponsored consumer goods such as the Volksempfänger (“People’s Radio”)
In May 1934, at a meeting at Berlin’s Kaiserhof Hotel, the German Chancellor insisted on a basic vehicle that could transport two adults and three children at 62 mph while consuming no more than 39 mpg. The engine had to be powerful for sustained cruising on Germany’s new Autobahnen.  Everything had to be designed to ensure parts could be quickly and inexpensively exchanged.  The engine had to be air-cooled because, as the Chancellor explained, not every country doctor had his own garage (ethylene glycol antifreeze was only just beginning to be used in high-performance liquid-cooled aircraft engines.


The car was officially designated the Volkswagen Type 1, but was more commonly known as the Beetle. Following the restart of production and the establishment of sales network and exports to Netherlands, Heinz Nordhoff was appointed director of the Volkswagen factory in 1949.  Under Nordhoff, production increased dramatically over the following decade, with the one-millionth car coming off the assembly line by 1955. During this post-war period, the Beetle had superior performance in its category with a top speed of 71 mph and 0-60 mph in 27.5 seconds with fuel consumption of 36 mpg for the standard 34 hp engine. This was far superior to the Citroën 2CV, which was aimed at a low speed/poor road rural peasant market, and Morris Minor, designed for a market with no motorways; it was even competitive with more advanced small city cars like the Austin Mini. Truly a 20th Century classic.
With its oval rear window, and grey coachwork this is a wonderfully preserved example of an early 1200 cc Volkswagen Beetle, offered with UK V5 registration and current MoT certificate.



SELECTED BY: CLASSIC CHATTER
KEEPING IT CLASSIC
Since: 2010


Sunday, 23 October 2016

1974 FERRARI 246GT E-SERIES - COYS AUCTIONS

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: CLCK HERE
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COMING TO AUCTION
Brought to you by: Classic Chatter

Classic Chatter is an independent website for owners & enthusiasts of all types of historic vehicles.

As well as our main website we post regularly on our sites related to Showroom Classics, Auction & Event News.



SATURDAY 29th OCTOBER 2016
ALEXANDRA PALACE, LONDON, N22 7AY

Website: www.coys.co.uk

1974 FERRARI 246 GT – E SERIES

COACHWORK BY SCAGLIETTI - DESIGN BY PININFARINA 

ORIGINAL RIGHT HAND DRIVE



It was the need for a production-based engine for the new Formula 2 that led to the introduction of a ‘junior’ Ferrari, the Dino 206GT, at the Turin Motor Show in 1967. Building on experience gained with its successful limited edition Dino 206S sports-racer of 1966, Ferrari retained the racer’s mid-engine layout for the road car but installed the power unit transversely rather than longitudinally.


A compact, aluminium-bodied coupe of striking appearance, the Pininfarina-styled Dino – named after Enzo Ferrari’s late son Alfredino Ferrari and intended as the first of a separate but related marque – was powered by a 2.0-liter, four-cam V6 driving through an in-unit five-speed transaxle. The motor’s 180bhp was powerful enough to propel the lightweight, aerodynamically efficient Dino to 142mph, and while there were few complaints about the car’s performance, the high cost enforced by its aluminium construction hindered sales.


A 2.4-litre version on a longer wheelbase – the 246GT – replaced the Dino 206 in late 1969. The body was now steel and the cylinder block cast-iron rather than aluminium, but the bigger engine’s increased power – 195bhp at 7,600rpm – was adequate compensation for the weight gain. A Targa-top version, the 246GTS, followed in 1972. While not quite as fast in a straight line as its larger V12-engined stable-mates, the nimble Dino was capable of showing almost anything a clean pair of heels over twisty going.


Order number D/632 was placed with the factory on the 6th July 1973 as part of Maranello Concessionaires August allocation of cars. The order was acknowledged on the 27th July. The car was invoiced by the factory on the 11th October 1973 for delivery to the UK by truck.
On Saturday the 12th January 1974 Mr Ian Phillips from car dealers Phillips (Belfast) Ltd met Maranello Concessionaires Ltd sales director, Mike Salmon.  On the 30th April 1976 the car was purchased and registered to Greencoat Motor Co of London, with some 24,000 miles.
Greencoat Motor Co sold the car to Mr Howard Baws of Kent, registering the car to him on the 25th June 1976. Mr Baws owned the car for just over twelve months when it was bought by Mr Victor Melik of Wales on the 29th June 1977; Mr Melik using John Etheridge of Chelsea to maintain it. It was purchased by Mr Howard Thomas of The Paper Supply Company of London, on the 21st September 1978 now with 34,000 miles.
A letter from Greencoat Motor Company dated the 27th September 1978 to Mr Thomas set out the cars background to date – albeit they did say it came from Jersey rather than Northern Ireland. During Mr Thomas’s ownership it was maintained by the then Ferrari agents Brighton Car Concessionaires Ltd, The car was purchased by Mr William Jepp of Surrey on the 29th June 1981 who bought the car with circa 48,000 miles. Mr Jepp used Modena Engineering, for maintenance.


Mr Percival Webster of Sussex,  became the next recorded keeper on the 18th May 1982. Mr Percival owned the car for eight years when solicitor Mr Rory Fordyce of Middlesex became the next registered keeper on the 25th May 1988.Mr Fordyce appears to have sent it to Joe Nash of Dino Services, a major Dino specialist at this time. It was then  purchased by Mr David Edwards of South Wales for £29,000 on the 27th July 1990. Mr Edwards had Dino Services complete the restoration which is documented with invoices and colour photographs. The car was refinished in its current hue of Rosso 300. The paintwork alone costing £6,044.40 (29-10-90 Invoice No E389) The engine, gearbox, suspension, steering and brakes were also rebuilt by Dino Services with the final invoice in February 1991. It was re-trimmed in tan with black “Daytona” inserts by Dave Strange of Send, Surrey for £3,750 being completed on the 27th March 1991. Mr Edwards used the car, returning it to Joe Nash for a 500 mile service on the 3rd January 1992. Following a road test, a report by London Ferrari agents HR Owen and now with 55,455 miles on the 9th November 1992, it was purchased by former 308 GT4 owner, Mr Phillip Brigstock of London who became the registered keeper on the 9th November 1992. Maintenance passed to Kent High Performance Cars of Maidstone, Kent. The car was entered in the 1994 Ferrari Owners Club, where it won its class – first time entrants-with 332 points. Mr Brigstock kept the car until late 1997 when it was purchased by Mr Richard Boyd of Warwickshire who entrusted Mortimer Houghton Turner to look after the car. This included new camshafts, head gaskets and a clutch (October 1997 @59,577 miles) as well as routine servicing. The car passed into the ownership of Paradise Racing Ltd on the 19th July 1999 who sold it to Mr Alecos Pappas of London later that year. Mr Pappas took the car to the dry climate of Athens, Greece, before returning it to the UK and to Paradise Garage of London. Mr Sven Lorenz of London became the next recorded keeper on the 14th March 2003, buying the car from Paradise Garage


The penultimate owner, Mr Russell Backhouse of Dorset, became the next recorded keeper on the 12th November 2007.The last owner,  a gentleman from London,  bought the car in April 2010 with 63,289 miles.

A total of just 498 right hand drive Dino GTs were delivered to the UK via Maranello Concessionaires Limited; rarely are they offered on the open market. Not to be confused with the common left hand drive variant, this motor car is for the true Ferrari collector. Less than half the price of a Daytona, and trailing some way behind a 206 GT, this late 1960s Pininfarina designed Ferrari offers terrific value in today’s market.


SELECTED BY: CLASSIC CHATTER
KEEPING IT CLASSIC
Since: 2010